Brittany Carson

I am a post doc at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Institute in Toronto. I currently work on glioma, but have studied breast cancer, multiple myeloma and renal cancer, with a focus on cell-signaling pathways, translational regulation, the cell cycle and the cytoskeleton to develop novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. My science journey has taken me through cell culture, flies, worms and mice and through many different techniques. I love photography (including microscopy), traveling and non-science reading.

Scientist vs. Machine: The epic battle to get research done

It seems that all scientists have had that moment– the moment where you feel totally defeated by a machine. At some point in your day you will likely need to use some piece of equipment for experiments – incubators, shakers, microscopes,

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Stop stealing my pipettes: A guide to lab etiquette fundamentals

With the demands of research as they are, labs often become bustling centers of activity. Ultimately, we all want to generate a substantial amount of exciting data that would further our projects and publications in a timely manner despite also

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3 Culture contaminants you hate and how to save your cells

Sterile cell culture practice is key to avoid contamination by microorganisms, which would then interfere with the integrity of your cell system and your experiments. While most of us are careful and well trained in proper cell culture technique,

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How to present during lab meeting without new data

Brittany Carson
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Cell culture: Know your cells for successful, reproducible results

Although in vivo experiments are prized because they allow the study your protein/RNA/biological phenomenon within the complexity of the organism, in vitro systems, such as cell culture, also have their merits. For assays where you need a

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Life as a scientist: When science follows you home—and everywhere else

Academic science as a career is unique in that in order to succeed, one must learn to think and write in a specific way—as a scientist. It starts with learning to question, hypothesize, and apply the experimental approach correctly. It then

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Immunofluorescence on fixed cells: Planning and optimizing experiments

When planning an immunofluorescence (IF) experiment on fixed cells, it is important to consider which protocol will best suit your experimental setup. Usually you can check the literature to see what has been done previously (and successfully),

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Experimental failure: Embrace troubleshooting for deeper knowledge

Brittany Carson
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PCR: Master the basics for reliable results

Brittany Carson
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